Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: Tramp Cat and Mittens 

*This post was started weeks ago, but due to technical difficulties it’s just now getting finished and posted. Now to figure out how to replace a charging port…

I am blessed with three good barn cats. They do their job and are sociable with people as well as the sheep. I fact, they often nap with the ewes and out tom Clive loves to go out to the big field with the flock on a sunny day. So, with the cold weather we’ve kept them in carriers in the house at night. The strange thing: we’ve heard a lot of bumps under the house.

Sophie Ann LaClaire is a hybrid someone put out. As far as she’s concerned we’re BFFs.

Now, bumps under the house are normal when Otis, the resident possum, is doing his cat impression at night. He and Sophie the cat are besties. But this is something larger, and well, doesn’t smell like Otis. All the critters have been on edge and I’ve been bracing myself, concerned the foxes had made a new den. But no. It’s a big orange cat tramping around, looking for food. Now that the mystery is solved I can rest a little netter and concentrate on my night knitting.

Cloe. When it’s super cold I let her sleep on the foot of the bed… where she actually stays.

On the Wheel

My piles of Romney fleeces are spinning up nicely. Spinning in the grease means no prep time. Usually I spin up a pound of prepared with plying included in fourteen to fifteen hours (and I’ve done it in a single insane day). When I spin in the grease my average is half a pound in eighteen hours. However, it usually takes me about twice that long to really prep the fibers. So, with the massive cold front still clinging to the country, it’s enjoyable to not scour.

Off the wheel

I completed my mitten spinning! I wasn’t sure about mixing the courser Targhee and Jacob wool with my gorgeous fawn alpaca. But I’m truly pleased. The alpaca really softened up what is traditionally sock yarn in my house.I had planned to felt, but it’s thick, warm, and comfortable just like it is.

Since the mitten yarn came out so nice I dug out the coveted Hopkins fluff left over from combing on my viking combs. Most people toss it, but, well, that’s not my style. I picked through it to get out the neps and noils, then got busy with the hand carders. I’m even more pleased with the softness of this yarn. I may snag Go Lightly’s fleece this year from my neighbor. He’s Hopkins’s son and the fleece is very similar. In short, I want to reproduce this blend for both color and texture.

On the Needles

I’m finishing up my mittens. Honestly, I’m not sure what to knit next. I know I’ll need a sweater next year, and maybe a hooded cowl, but otherwise the household is set on knit wear for a few years barring mice and moths. And, I’ve got to concentrate on spinning and weaving along with up coming farm work for spring.

Off the Needles

I made two new hats for chores. They’re leftovers from other past projects. I didn’t use a pattern. Both are knitted flat and then stitched up the side. My ears are much happier!

Out of the Pot

Last autumn when it was Kavass making season I tried dyeing with beets. I crave a red dye that’s deep and substantial. However, beets are not a color fast dye. So now I have a three pound Jacob fleece with a weird yellowish cast coupled with pink streaks. Not good.

Last week I pulled out my dye pot and cherry koolaid. Can I just say “Yummy”? I’m calling it Cherry Cola Float. The red with hints of the Jacob browns with just hints of pinks and whites is so lovely. With the puni style rolags I added a touch of firestar. When I’m done working up this batch they’ll being the Etsy shop. I’m thinking next is green, or yellow. I feel a soda themed color way collection coming on!

Weaving

My little wrap is off the loom.

Even though it’s off the loom, the work isn’t over.

I’m warping for a double width throw blanket. Frankly, I AM NERVOUS. This is my first time using only my best handspun to double width. But hey, slow and steady wins the race, and that’s my plan.

Hopefully my technical issues are resolved.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: It’s all Ducky

Unfortunately, I didn’t get this week’s Friday’s Flock posting done because I rehomed a whopping thirty one ducks to a farm in Dixon, Tennessee. It was sweet seeing them meet the other geese and ducks, and a relief that the feed bill is essentially cut in two. My remaining six duck hens are with the chickens, and the drake is now bunking with the geese. Hopefully this way I’ll get to enjoy the eggs, and not have them breeding like, well, ducks all over the farm. But, I did make progress on the knitting and spinning projects.

Duckys

On the Wheel

I’m still spinning Romney in the grease. In fact, I found another fleece in my studio in what I thought was an empty bin. However, the carding on the alpaca and wool mittens is coming along well. Originally, the plan was for seventy percent wool and thirty percent alpaca. Then I  realized i want them even warmer. So, it’s a fifty fifty blend. I ran out of jacob wool, so instead I’m finishing up with black targee. It’s not as soft, and boy is it high in vm. But the color matches, and it should felt nicely.  It goes on the wheel this evening!

On the Needles 

My mom loves handspun socks for slippers around the house. I wanted to have them done last week, but it didn’t happen.  Between hay runs, freezing weather, a ewe coming up pregnant, Christmas dinner, moving into the main house for the remainder of the winter, and ducks, they just didn’t get done. Oh, and they needed resizing in the toe. Like, serious resizing. We got a good laugh. So, this one is almost done, and then it’s mitten time!

Off the Needles 

Technically, this was done last Monday. However, it was a gift and a surprise. It was supposed to be a sheep, but I think it’s more bear than sheep. I’ve never made a stuffed animal before.  Not bad for a first go. It was fun to make, and maybe there will be more in the future.  Maybe. But he is super cute.

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Chesca’s Lamb turned Bear!

On the Loom

I did get the loom warped! This time I’m making a wrap. It’s acrylic, but this piece needs to be washable. It’s just a simple tabby weave, and it’s coming along quickly.

Well, I’m off on another hay run and to muck the stalls.

Until next time,

In all you do, craft no harm.

Moriah

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Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: The Deluge 

We had four inches of rain over this past week, and almost three were over a twenty four hour period. The entire homestead quickly went from damp to soggy to a trees floating through the front yard and wading through squelching mud. I’ve gotten lots of spinning and knitting done this week!

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Our driveway and front field. The water is about waist deep.

On the Wheel 

This past week I’ve been spinning up a beautiful Romney fleece in the grease as featured in this week’s Winding up Wednesday: Spin that Fleece.

Romney Fleece

My current sweaters are rather breezy commercially produced cotton. So, with over fifty pounds of white Romney wool in my studio and another twenty in the barn I decided knitting a sweater for myself is in order. It’s spinning up into a soft aran weight three ply. Once I have enough yarn for a decently long sweater with a shawl collar I’ll put this fleece on my combs and make yarn for the Etsy shop. I plan to spin Romney for the next several weeks, so there won’t be too much to report for the next thirty pounds of spinning.

In addition to the three ply I’ve spun up some hanks of two ply sport as a gift. One of the mini hanks is dyed using marigolds.

Two ply made from mother and daughter. They didn’t full at the same rate…. but still it’s the thought, right?

 I’ve also been spinning up random bits of fleeces that I’m finding here and there. Any fluff bits less than half a pound are getting stuffed into a bag. I plan to just put it all randomly through the drum carder when I get a few pounds. It’s destined to be brilliant or shear madness.

I do plan on squeezing in some Targee alpaca blend this week. I desperately need new mittens for morning chores. I’m hoping with the Targee it felts easily and with the alpaca it keeps me warm.

Off the Needles 

My Sacre Couer shawl is finally knitted up and finished! I had to frog out the original work due to a dropped stitch. I tried to fix it, but if you’ve ever tried to fix a dropped stitch in a complicated lace knitting pattern, then you understand why sometimes you need to just love Kermit. I was going to just rip back to the mistake, but then I began looking at my color palette and decided to just start over knitting from the beginning, with bead work.  I’m glad I did. I’ll be reviewing this pattern next week.  It’s a beautiful shawlette, but it definitely had difficulties.

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Sacre Couer Shawlette

I also finished another project this week,  but I have to wait until next week to show it since it’s a gift. But it sure is cute!

On the Needles

I have one sock left to finish up this weekend for tomorrow. It’s just a pair of plain basic socks knitted up on dpn’s. The wool is squishy Jacob. I don’t remember who it is, but I’m think it may be Charlemagne Bolivar’s. I do know these socks are not fancy, but they are super comfy and warm. I may make a new pair for myself, too.

Dyed in the Wool

I’ve continued dying locks this week. Well, I continued until the rain turned or spring muddy and we stopped using piped water until it clears up again. As soon as I have decent light again the locks will go in the Etsy shop, too. And when the water clears up I’ll be finally rinsing that last batch of lavender dyed locks that sitting under the kitchen bench.

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Closing Remarks

This week has been a productive one, even with the weather. Yes, chores in the cold rain aren’t fun, but it has set me thinking on how people traditionally dressed in wool on farms, and what items I can incorporate into a modern style. I have man-made winter and rain clothing, but it never keeps me as warm and dry as my wool. Even the manufactured items I favor tend to be all wool or all cotton.

As much as dealing with this deluge is unpleasant, the water will keep the pasture in shape, providing green grass this spring. I’m thankful for the squelching mud and extra mucking, because it’s the cycle of nature that allows my flock to thrive and keep me warm and dry.

In all you do, craft no harm

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: Busy as a Beaver 

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We are blessed with an abundance of wildlife here at Serenity. We regularly see deer in the woods, squirrels, the occasional coyote and timber wolf, turkeys, herons, song birds, hawks, and even bald eagles. We have a possum living under our house named Otis. However, living on the creek we get to enjoy the engineering marvels of the American Beaver. This year they’re living almost in the front yard. So, in addition to the regular work, knitting, spinning, sewing, and celebrating holidays, we’re wrapping trees in chicken wire. Even as pest like as these overgrown rats are, it’s difficult not to admire their industry and ingenuity.

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One of our trees wrapped in chicken wire. We’re trying to preserve our big tree, some of which have tops as big as the house!

On the Wheel

I enjoy spinning roving, real traditional hand combed roving, not processed top being sold as roving. However, spending hours with my Viking combs can get exhausting. My arms get quite the workout daily mucking stalls and hauling hay, so by the end of an hour combing my shoulders are aching loudly.

What’s my solution when I’m craving a true worsted yarn and farm chores are heavy? Lock spinning straight from the fleece. That’s correct. Part of Daisy’s fleece is slated for spinning with no processing beyond a good wash out in hot water and some flick carding on the ends.

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This method is not suitable for short fleeces by a long shot. I’ve actually flick carded the tips on fleeces with a one inch staple. It was tedious to say the least. But Daisy has gorgeous five to six inch locks, and a perfect Romney lock structure. This spinning is gift spinning, and I’m planning on featuring the technique and dyeing the first Winding up Wednesday in January. In the mean time, some of Daisy’s mom’s locks are headed to the Etsy store.

Off the Wheel 

Somehow I managed to finish up both Oatmeal Girl and Jackie this week. It was definitely a challenge. Overall, I’m pleased with both spins. Unfortunately, I didn’t get Jackie’s fleece spun in time to continue knitting the Sacre Couer shawl. I’ll finish washing out the yarn this week,  and hopefully my newest blanket will go on the loom the first week in January.

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Jackie in front and Oatmeal Girl in the back. Jackie is the lightest grey I’ve ever seen.

 

On the Needles

The Sacre Couer shawl is still on my needles this week. Unfortunately, I just didn’t have time to work on it last week. But, finishing it up is my main goal this week. I have decided to put beads on it. I’m considering some shiny silver beads, or maybe black. It really depends on what Walmart has in stock. One of the trade offs for living in a small town is that Walmart is the only craft store. But, hey, we’re getting a Burger King and a fourth traffic light! Oh, and there’s still a hitching post at Walmart. So, at least our Walmart is cool that way.

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Sacre Couer Shawl – Finally all the yarn made!

Out of the Dye Pot 

Speaking of Daisy early,  I dyed some of her Mother’s locks this week. They’ll go in the Etsy shop this evening. I used food dye for this project. I’m beyond pleased with the results.

I dyed these in the microwave. I’m slightly suspicious of microwaved food, and microwaved locks sounded a bit far fetched. However, microwaving locks is my new addiction! They turn out so well.

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Round Up

Hopefully, the beavers won’t keep me too busy this week, and I’ll be as busy as they are this coming week in my studio. With the New Year approaching my mind is thinking ahead to planning new projects. Many are as ambitious as my creek dwelling neighbors. However, I suspect I’ll never be as single minded as our busy beavers.

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The hut is actually under that tree in the creek bank, but they have an impressive pile of food.

In all you do, craft no harm.

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: Deep Freeze

Winter has finally arrived to our little cove and driven me inside for the yearly hibernation. We aren’t expecting a day over forty degrees until March or night above freezing until April. I don’t know how our northernmost neighbors cope, but around her we snuggle in and wait. 

Oh, I’ll still be out to see my sheep, love on hens, and train my riding steer, do chores and what not, but the days spinning on the porch or knitting under the pear tree over over until late spring. I’m so looking forward to getting some serious knitting accomplished and starting the winter spinning campaign before next year’s shearing in May. So without further Adu here’s this week’s Saturday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin!

ON THE WHEEL 

This week’s spinning Project is to finish up the Jacob ewe fleece from last week. There’s less than a pound to go. This particular ewe belongs to my neighbor at Spring Rock. She had a skin issue, and I snagged a free fleece on shearing day. I did have to heavily skirt this fleece, but I am pleased with the over all results. The fleece was divided into two portions: dark and light. The sheep is freckled, which means there are black specks throughout the cream wool. This creates a lovely heathered oatmeal yarn. I was thinking about using all of this fleece as warp, but I think part of the yarn will end up in my new socks!

I decided to card this particular fleece on my curves hand carders. The fleece is short, and even after sending it through my Little Dynamo picker it was a bit “farmish”. I found carding sorted out the majority of residual rubbish. The singles are a traditional long draw, and the final yarn is a fingerling Navajo three ply.

The black wool from this sheep is brown headed into lilac. It’s not a true lilac, yet. I think the color is lovely, and I’ll continue with the same spinning style and weight for the entire fleece.

My next spinning Project for this week is to finish up this gorgeous lilac Jacob fleece from Jackie. Jackie, a ewe, died several years ago and I’ve been putting off spinning her fleece. The white section of wool is already sitting by the loom waiting for me to finish up the warp. But the lilac, well, that’s going into something special: my current shawl project. It’s surprisingly soft, but then again she was still fairly young. I’ll be using her wool in my current knitting project.

ON THE NEEDLES

It’s been a while since I took on a lace shawl. I found the Sacre Coeur shawl pattern on Ralvery and knew it was perfect for my next shawl project.

There are three patterns in the shawl so I decided to use three different yarns, all handspun, of course. The first is some Shetland I traded Romney for. It’s a beautiful moorit. It’s spun dk weight on a drop spindle. The Arch Lace section is some of Charlemagne Bolivar’s second fleece. It was spun on my antique wheel, Abigail, from homemade combed roving produced on my Indigo Hound hand combs. I used copper, spinach, carrot tops, some holly hocks, and coffee in an iron pot and lots of patience to concoct this color of green. I don’t think it’s a repeatable colorway.

The next section of lace will be Jackie’s lilac wool that I’m currently spinning. I am keeping a bit of it for my next color work project, but her lilac is a perfect color. I’m still debating to put on beads or not. But that’s a decision for another day.

Finished! 

This week I started and finished my new sweater vest! I was in the mood to make something chunky and quick. I chose to use some texel i had just laying around. The pattern is the Shawl Collar Vest on Ralvery. It’s also a free pattern. I did make the shoulder portion longer than instructed, but my shoulders and arms are pretty stout for my frame. Lifting hay bales will do that. I didn’t have enough yarn to make it as big as I’d like, but honestly, I’m very pleased. I do plan to use this pattern again, and make a few as gifts. It’s quick, easy, and the sizing is flexible. If you’re looking for an easy and satisfying sweater pattern, this is it.

Also completed this week is my new scarf. It’s just a simple lace border with plain garter stitch. It’s made from the very first fleece i ever processed. Interesting enough, this ram also ended up as the foundation ram for most of my flock. This scarf is part of a fleece study that will take several years to complete, and you will be hearing about my study periodically. But in the meantime, I’m enjoying my scarf!

That’s it for this week’s Spinning and Knitting. Don’t forget to check out our brand new podcast on YouTube that airs today and feel free to leave your current projects in the comments below!  See you next week.

In all you do, craft no harm

Moriah and the flock