Monday’s Musings: Saying “NO”

 

20180215_173656.jpg
Sunset over Serenity Cove

I’m finally over my back injury, thankfully. Spring is here almost and the yearly push to do is starting. In years past I’ve taken on more than I should. It’s easy to learn boundaries and saying “no” to other people’s demands. But that’s not so easy to say to yourself sometimes.

 

For several years I’ve started a garden during lambing and shearing season. I’m also usually out selling early produce, eggs, jam, honey, and other items this time of year at the farmer’s market. It’s busy. But last year I drove my health into the ground. I had an accident that led to internal injuries and an infected organ. I kept pushing. Lambi was ill, and I was up checking on her all hours of the night. I put in a garden, pushed through the early farmer’s market season, pushed myself training my ox, milking, managing and working cattle, etc. By June I was exhausted. I’m not a girl of twenty five, or even thirty five anymore, but I was determined to meet my short term goals.

It’s so easy to do that in life. We jump into something full force and don’t pace ourselves for the long haul. We use gusto instead of technique and consistency. Too often we are the hare and not the tortoise. This year, I’m the tortoise. Shearing, wool, teaching, and writing are my focus. Why? because long term that’s what brings me joy. Long term, that joy and passion bring my success. This year I’m saying “NO” to my little short term goals that don’t align with my long term goals. It’s not easy. I enjoy many of my short term endeavors. But ultimately, they don’t create the life I am intentionally creating.

I challenge you to look at the long term effects of your short term goals. Are you being the hare? Are you wearing yourself out mentally, physically, or emotionally following a path that cares for the moment and not for your life? It’s tough to admit sometimes that what we give our energy to isn’t working. But in the end, having the energy to care for our lives is the kindest thing we can do for ourselves, and for those we love.

In all you do craft no harm,

Moriah

 

20180219_172721.jpg
Same sunset from the ridge

 

 

Winding Up Wednesday

Last week I made a hay run. Big deal, right? I make hay runs all the time. However, this time I parked up the hill from the barn. That’s not so bad. However, I was a little addled due to dropping the trailer in the creek. Like IN THE CREEK, and then sliding back down the bank… I just wasn’t thinking my best when I let the trailer off the truck hitch without having first put concrete blocks and chucks down to lock to the trailer’s wheel. The trailer started rolling down the hill. I screamed, and it dragged me a good six feet before I dug my heels in and stopped it. That’s right. I stopped two thousand pounds of hay headed for my momma and my barn. I’m sore. I’m strained and sprained and all kinds of stiff and aching. So, I haven’t done much spinning. I’m slowly working on the Romney and Jacob. I’ve only gotten three hanks done instead of my usual five to seven a week. I’m still making the finishing touches to my pink and white wrap, and that’s the entirety of my fiber crafts this week.

So, you’re going to hear my philosophy about why everyone in the world should try spinning at least once.

Universal

Pretty much anywhere people grow fiber or can harvest wild fibers, spinning occurs. I was reading an article in Spin magazine recently that highlighted the textile culture of First Peoples in America. My Welsh and Scottish ancestors kept sheep and spun fiber. The Chinese perfected silk cultivation before my Jewish ancestors even existed as a religion, and we know they kept sheep and wove tapestries complete with metal threads.

According to Wikipedia the archeology records show that hand spinning and weaving date back at least twenty thousand years. That’s the Paleolithic era. That’s pretty the dawn of modern humanity. If you sat down a woman from the stone age, Ancient Greece or Africa, an Inca woman from Pre-Columbus America, a Samaritan, or a Scottish granny from two hundred years ago and gave them fiber, they could give you yarn.

What I’m driving at here is that fiber arts, spinning, felting, weaving in its many forms are all part of our universal heritage. It’s in our very DNA as human beings. It has no boundaries of nationality, skin color, ethnic orientation, not political borders. I think that’s one reason I love it so much beyond just the obvious.

Every time I pick up a fleece, sit down and start spinning, I’m connecting to my history as a human being. I think that’s pretty special. So, get out there and embrace your history, people. Because spinning is your heritage.

Until next time,

Craft no Harm,

Moriah

Monday’s Musings: Intention and Failure

The key is leave our hesitation and self doubt behind.

There’s an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation where a character, Data, does everything “right”, with the best intentions, and still fails. While he’s moping in his quarters, questioning himself, his job performance, and goals, his captain, Picard, comes to speak to him. Picard tells Data that even when we do our best with the most noble intention, take every precaution, we sometimes fail. The key is leave our hesitation and self doubt behind. I love that scene.

So often we become emotionally entangled in what we perceive as our failures. We become focused on results. We cease to first exam our intention. We become wrapped up in self doubt and we hesitate to live our highest ideals. We become stagnant, putrid in our own self rejection.

By examing intention before planning or acting we expand our definition of success, and the human experience. If our intention is kindness, mercy, justice, the betterment of society, and wellbeing towards ourselves and others then we are less apt to judge ourselves as failures. We become more mindful of our plans and actions. We measure success not in a promotion or high paying job, but in lives transformed, a kind word, a smile. We measure our success in leaving self doubt and hesitation behind. In short, when we live by pure intention first, our plans may not happen how we desire, but we succeed in living a full and meaningful life.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Friday’s Farmlife: Garden Planning

Most people think winter is not the time for gardening. But in reality, winter is when the gardening cycle begins. Even though I’m not out working much this time of year, there’s still work to be done.

I’ve decided to branch out and cover more aspects of farm life and homesteading than just the sheep. There’s SO MUCH to share that goes on around here! There are so many skills that people have lost, and that I’m learning. Things that need to be shared. Without further adue, let’s get into it.

 

GARDEN PLANNING

Most people think winter is not the time for gardening. But in reality, winter is when the gardening cycle begins. Even though I’m not out working much this time of year, there’s still work to be done.

I can and preserve much of our winter food in a typical year. I start my plan by figuring out what I have cheap and easy access to, what is more expensive, and what I actually have room to grow. I also look at what can be preserved that’s expensive in winter. Lately that seems like everything.

My current garden is on top of solid bedrock and gravel. This means everything goes in beds, and I make my dirt yearly via compost. This is labor intensive, and really curtails my planting. Space is at a premium. This means harder to find, higher priced food gets top billing. But, I also know what we eat most.

IMG_20170712_123404_3

Like most Southern families we love our garden fresh, homegrown, never even seen a hothouse tomatoes. I know we need ten tomato plants, plus about another ten bushels from the local Mennonite community for our household. This is a year’s supply of fresh tomatoes, soup, chili, and sauces. One plant will be a high yield cherry tomato, five are heirlooms, and four are determinate that get replaced mid summer. I’m a fan of black tomatoes, too, but enjoy yellow or orange salsa. Tomatoes are also a big chunk of our weekly food budget as well as a big space taker in the garden. Based on this information, I can easily pick out what varieties to start in March or purchase in May. This year I’m going with Black Cherry, Purple Cherokee, German Queen, and Old Mennonite along with Better Bush as my determinate type.

We also love onions and garlic around here. I have elephant garlic and a landrance type garlic Uncle Enis gave me my first year here. Since alums enjoy repeat growing in the same bed, it’s easy to plan for those plants. The same is true of my asparagus patch. It’s pretty much not going anywhere until I begin divisions year after next. All I do is trim the old foliage and put on thin layer of compost down in the spring.

20170624_095140

Potatoes are another staple for us. I have good success growing them in wire towers. Since the sheep don’t like them, I can actually just plant them along the fence row and save valuable bed space. I usually end up with ten to fifteen pounds per tower. It’s definitely the easiest and least labor intensive way I’ve ever grown potatoes. I always grow Pontiac Reds. They melt like butter in my mouth. We have potatoes right up until December. This year I’ll be planting ten towers.

From there I look at what else we actually eat. Peas, zucchini, beets, radishes, purple cauliflower, greens, lettuce, kale, cabbage, Broccoli, winter squash, corn, green beans, spinach, rocket, cucumbers, herbs, and shelly beans made the list.

Our corn will go our front, and so will the squash and beans. I’m planning on trying three sisters this year. The rest go in back far away from the animals and right out the back door.

Cabbage, beets, and green beans are easy to come by, as are strawberries, plums, blackberries, apples, and melons. In fact, I usually snag free culls from behind the produce washing and packing houses. Since I can find these for free or cheap, I pass on growing them. I also know I grow some things other people don’t. Last year I traded for three gallons of mulberries. Yum.

I draw out my garden space into different sections, and then draw out each section with its beds. My beds are thirty inches by about twelve feet. From there I put in high priority  food – peas, zucchini, greens, lettuce, kale, and herbs. If there’s any room left over I might try a new plant. This year, it’s cockscomb on the outside of the garden.

As my early spring crops die off I’ll replace them with broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, carrots, and shelly beans.  This way I can have fresh food from March until December. That’s ten months. Whatever we do not eat in a few days gets canned each harvest. There’s nothing better in the dead of winter to pop open a can of tomatoe soup base, toss in some beans and potatoes, herbs, spices, and have a hot bowl of chili grown on your own land. This means we eat what’s in season typically.

20161018_092049

 

Why

Like many working class families we are always looking for ways to reduce our grocery bill. If we grew nothing but lettuce and spinach in pots we’d save over sixty dollars a month for two people. The same goes with our tomatoes. At a dollar a can, and ten cans a week, growing tomatoes saves us $520 a year, and that doesn’t include fresh tomatoes. Just those two items is an entire month’s income not going out yearly. Add in the six or seven dozen cantaloupes, the gallons of fresh berries, a few hundred pounds of potatoes, another hundred pounds of onions, and you are up to THOUSANDS OF dollars in food. Yes, it costs money to get started, but once you have heirloom seeds, and learn to save them, most of the cost is done. Gardening can be pretty much free.

Another reason is that it’s fun, and healthy. It feels good to get out there and do something in nature. It’s physical without being strenuous.

We can sell some of our extra food or trade it for other items we don’t have.

I enjoy it. The garden, the thrill of pulling beautiful food out of the canner, and eating my handiwork all year. It just tastes better. When you eat fresh homegrown food you are eating the height of nutrition.

20150324_191902

Closing Tips

Garden planning really isn’t too hard. It just takes some time, some thinking, and a bit of mindfulness. It’s really just menu planning, but way ahead! If you want to plan a garden, now is the time to contact your local ag extension office and find out what time to plant in your area.

No matter if you’re doing rows, containers, or doing beds, start simple and don’t go overboard.

Don’t be afraid to put in long term plants and plant around them.

The twenty five cent packets of seeds grow just as well as the $2 packets of seeds.

Buy heirlooms and collect your seeds each year.

Have fun.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

18670910_1422598204452555_1829569514662568723_n

Winding up Wednesday: The Babe Production Wheel – A Review

* I am in no way associated with Babe spinning wheels. I’m just reviewing what I like and don’t like about my wheel.

In 2012 I FINALLY got my first spinning wheel. She’s an antique wheel from The Netherlands. I call her Abigail. I love spinning on her, but for serious spinning she’s just not sturdy enough.

And that’s why in 2014 I bought Josephine – my Babe Production Wheel. I decided on a Babe because it was the cheapest option for a double treadle wheel I could fine at the time. I thought about building one, but then I realized by the time I bought the racing wheel chair wheel, the pipes, etc, I’d pay almost as much for some aggravation without a return policy. No thanks.

My Babe arrived one afternoon and within half an hour I was spinning happily. Not too bad for three hundred dollar plumbing pipes and spare parts. So, let me start by telling you what I DON’T like about my wheel. (And don’t tell Josephine, it would hurt her feelings!)

The built in lazy Kate is kind of a joke. I mean, it’s great in a snap, but there’s no way to REALLY flow with properly tensions singles while plying. Over time I’ve learned to adapt, but the dollar store basket with my bobbins on knitting needles still wins.

It’s plastic. Yes. I know, I bought a plastic wheel. It’s not a major issue, but it’s not PRETTY. It’s not sustainable.

It makes an awful racket when I’m winding off a bobbin straight onto my skein winder while said bobbin is on the wheel. No matter how much oil I feed her, she still complains.

Don’t try to do art yarns on this model. They make a bulky wheel for a reason!

Now, onto the likes!

Overall this wheel spins pretty smooth. I think it’s the ball barings. It’s easy to start and stop, speed up and slow down. I like that!

Another fave feature is the double treadle. My calves are even and if I sprain an ankle I can still spin. Considering it’s typically my right ankle I sprain, that’s a big bonus.

The bobbins are a perfect size. Four ounces is a comfortable size for an afternoon of spinning. Of course, if you’re up for a good game of bobbin chicken six ounces is doable.

The company makes spinning bobbins and plying bobbins. The plying bobbins are hard to miss since they’re bright red and bigger than the others. Since the whorl speed is determined by the bobbin size you can really control the ply twist angle easily. This creates a very consistent ply.

What I really enjoy is that in three and a half years of spinning on this wheel I’ve not had one break down, one problem, one broken drive band. I oil it regularly and spin three to eight hours daily. That’s allot of wear with no problems.

Overall, I’m pleased with my Babe. If you’re looking to get into spinning without shelling our almost a grand it’s definitely worth the investment.

That’s it for thisweek’s Winding up Wednesday.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Monday’s Musings: Quiet Time and Balance

My family has a wonderful tradition of easing into the morning. We get up, lounge in our house clothes, drink coffee, plan the day, pray, meditate, read, and linger in the stillness. Of course, this necessitates early rising, but it’s well worth it. Four a.m. is a wonderful time.

We also have a tradition of the mid day nap. Now, I’m not big on the napping part, but I am becoming a fan of the restful part as I slowly begin to age. We also wind down and relax before sleep. We chat, read, meditate, or in my case journal and listen to music while reflecting on the day.

You’re probably thinking we don’t get much done. Quite the opposite is true. Or that farm life must be exhausting and boring. It can be tough occasionally, but not really harsh. And farm life is never boring. No, my family has self care built into its fabric. This self care carries over into other areas.

It’s so easy to over extend ourselves into exhaustion, frustration, and self harm. We become tired, short tempered, and we slowly begin to compromise ourselves. This leads to compromises in how we interact with others, our work, and ultimately our life goals and dreams.

These past few weeks have been tough weeks. The freezes meant hauling water by hand, gallon after gallon to the animals. Now that it’s warm we are hauling tons of manure to the garden one wheelbarrow load at a time. My tablet’s power port broke. I have been staving off the flu going around and my body needed extra rest. I could have pushed myself into heroic self sacrifice mode, fixed the tablet, stayed up late writing and filming. But I chose a different path.

You see, I can’t live a life of kindness and integrity while denying myself kindness through self care, nor can I practice self care while ignoring my core responsibilities. Our culture seems bent on two conflicting modes at one time.

One is a never ending drive to produce. Our cell phones are constantly attached, we respond to emails and messages at every hour of the night and day, we work late, need overtime, and just can’t seem to turn off work and enjoy our relationships and time.

The other mode is play mode. We become so wrapped up in pleasure and rest that we end up just as burnt out emotionally as when we over extend ourselves. We sleep in, lounge to the point of ignoring responsibility, and act without consciousness towards others. To me, this also is self harm.

The challenge is to become mindful of work and play. To be within the moment while still practicing compassionate awareness of ourselves and others. To care for ourselves, to play, and to be productive with balance. It’s a choice, a habit of cultivating self directed kindness each day before we head into the world.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: Tramp Cat and Mittens 

*This post was started weeks ago, but due to technical difficulties it’s just now getting finished and posted. Now to figure out how to replace a charging port…

I am blessed with three good barn cats. They do their job and are sociable with people as well as the sheep. I fact, they often nap with the ewes and out tom Clive loves to go out to the big field with the flock on a sunny day. So, with the cold weather we’ve kept them in carriers in the house at night. The strange thing: we’ve heard a lot of bumps under the house.

Sophie Ann LaClaire is a hybrid someone put out. As far as she’s concerned we’re BFFs.

Now, bumps under the house are normal when Otis, the resident possum, is doing his cat impression at night. He and Sophie the cat are besties. But this is something larger, and well, doesn’t smell like Otis. All the critters have been on edge and I’ve been bracing myself, concerned the foxes had made a new den. But no. It’s a big orange cat tramping around, looking for food. Now that the mystery is solved I can rest a little netter and concentrate on my night knitting.

Cloe. When it’s super cold I let her sleep on the foot of the bed… where she actually stays.

On the Wheel

My piles of Romney fleeces are spinning up nicely. Spinning in the grease means no prep time. Usually I spin up a pound of prepared with plying included in fourteen to fifteen hours (and I’ve done it in a single insane day). When I spin in the grease my average is half a pound in eighteen hours. However, it usually takes me about twice that long to really prep the fibers. So, with the massive cold front still clinging to the country, it’s enjoyable to not scour.

Off the wheel

I completed my mitten spinning! I wasn’t sure about mixing the courser Targhee and Jacob wool with my gorgeous fawn alpaca. But I’m truly pleased. The alpaca really softened up what is traditionally sock yarn in my house.I had planned to felt, but it’s thick, warm, and comfortable just like it is.

Since the mitten yarn came out so nice I dug out the coveted Hopkins fluff left over from combing on my viking combs. Most people toss it, but, well, that’s not my style. I picked through it to get out the neps and noils, then got busy with the hand carders. I’m even more pleased with the softness of this yarn. I may snag Go Lightly’s fleece this year from my neighbor. He’s Hopkins’s son and the fleece is very similar. In short, I want to reproduce this blend for both color and texture.

On the Needles

I’m finishing up my mittens. Honestly, I’m not sure what to knit next. I know I’ll need a sweater next year, and maybe a hooded cowl, but otherwise the household is set on knit wear for a few years barring mice and moths. And, I’ve got to concentrate on spinning and weaving along with up coming farm work for spring.

Off the Needles

I made two new hats for chores. They’re leftovers from other past projects. I didn’t use a pattern. Both are knitted flat and then stitched up the side. My ears are much happier!

Out of the Pot

Last autumn when it was Kavass making season I tried dyeing with beets. I crave a red dye that’s deep and substantial. However, beets are not a color fast dye. So now I have a three pound Jacob fleece with a weird yellowish cast coupled with pink streaks. Not good.

Last week I pulled out my dye pot and cherry koolaid. Can I just say “Yummy”? I’m calling it Cherry Cola Float. The red with hints of the Jacob browns with just hints of pinks and whites is so lovely. With the puni style rolags I added a touch of firestar. When I’m done working up this batch they’ll being the Etsy shop. I’m thinking next is green, or yellow. I feel a soda themed color way collection coming on!

Weaving

My little wrap is off the loom.

Even though it’s off the loom, the work isn’t over.

I’m warping for a double width throw blanket. Frankly, I AM NERVOUS. This is my first time using only my best handspun to double width. But hey, slow and steady wins the race, and that’s my plan.

Hopefully my technical issues are resolved.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah