Saturday in the Studio April 6, 2019

The weather is stellar today at the Cove. I can’t believe this is the same farm that was bare trees and mud just a month ago. My onions are up, the garlic is growing, and I even have a few small lettuce plants up. It’s a good thing I farm, because this wasn’t my week in the Studio. I broke the drum carder and hand carders. They’re at the carpenter’s.So, this week you’ll have to just grab a mug of your favorite beverage (mine is coffee) and enjoy a tour of the Kind Fibers sanctuary.I did complete two shawl. The details are in the video.https://youtu.be/rya8u8EfDooUntil next time,Craft No Harm,Moriah and the flock

Spring is here! Saturday in the Studio: 3/29/19

It’s spring! It’s spring! It’s spring! Yep. I’m excited. I know it actually began on the 20th, but spring plowing, mild temperatures, and blossoming fruit trees all showed up this past week. I’ve had a lovely week working in the field, in the greenhouse, and of course the fiber studio. I’m actually writing this early, so it’s going to seem like a light week. However, even though this is still going out a the usual time it’s only been four days since my last post. I’ve been a busy bee!

On the Wheel

Iris was the main project on the wheel this week. I spun up 325 yards of heavy woolen from his fleece. That’s about a third of the wool. His fleece should yield around 950 yards. I think that’s more than sufficient for a sweater. Since there is so much I might do a shawl as well. However, this spinning project is going into the casual category from here on out. I have way too much to get done, and with adding another festival to the event schedule this year I need to focus on work. So, Iris is going to be only one spinning session a week until he’s done.

I also did some quick spinning this week. This fun lace/sock yarn is actually four mini hanks. I have not measured the yardage out yet because I haven’t washed them yet. They’ll go in the Etsy shop this week as a test product for a possible new line – Stash Builders.

Since my current knitting project is finished I also squeezed in some spinning for a new shawl project. I’m not sure what pattern I’ll do – as usual – but I do have some basic ideas about the color. This is wool from four different Jacob sheep. I was in the studio matching fleeces to blend the colors since Jacob has such variations in their fleece color. I suddenly realized that all four animals were related through the same foundation sire. I’m thinking about calling this project “All in the Family”. It’s a woolen Navajo ply in a dk weight. There is a little variation in weight since the body of the shawl will be worked closer in gauge and then open up into lace. I’d like to use the same size 8 needles for the entire project. Therefore I began my spin with a heavy DK and ended up in a weight closer to regular sock yarn.

That brings up an interesting topic. Many knitters, even those who spin, either purchase or produce yarn without an end goal in sight. I know I do sometimes still. In the past I just sat at the wheel to spin. Now I spin or purchase yarn with a very specific goal in mind. Sure, I don’t always know exactly the lace patterns or body style, or all the design elements, but I do have an idea in mind. I pulled out all my yarns last week and took inventory. My stash includes yarns I created almost ten years ago. They’re still just sitting there. Something about that feels wrong. Like they’re just stuck in limbo. So, after this shawl I’m laying off the spinning for a while other than custom work (and Iris) and concentrating on knitting and weaving what’s already in the studio. I’m stash busting!

On the Needles

I finished up the silk shawl I cast on last Friday. I really wanted to give up several times. I had to frog it twice! I just kept dropping stitches in the body. I realized my attitude towards this yarn was not right. It sticks to my hand, it’s slippery, and even on the wood needles I have to really concentrate on each stitch. With all the work piling up for spring planting I just wanted something easy. Then I realized something – my attitude dishonored not only myself and the caterpillars that made the silk, it dishonored the person that eventually will wear it. As soon as I realized that I ripped it out a third time, got my heart right, and started again. Guess what? I stopped dropping stitches. I stopped struggling with the beading, and I completed the shawl in less than eight hours – with beads. I let go of the fact that I’m not pleased with my first attempt of dying it. I let go of my ego. I had a tangible reminder that even though something doesn’t start easily, or seemed “messed up” doesn’t mean that’s the end of the story. A simple change of heart. A simple shift to focusing on love and compassion and the entire experience changed. I don’t know who will eventually wear this shawl. But I know it’s going to be someone special, maybe even someone who can relate to the process and story behind this shawl. No matter though. I needed the reminder, especially right before busy season. So – stranger who will grace my work – thank you.

In the Dye Pot

It’s empty. Come back next week 🙂

On the Loom

I finished up the last batt this week for the next meditation mat. I plan to warp Monday! I’m so excited to get back to weaving.

Around the Farm

Shearing is scheduled for the first week in April! YEAH!!!! My babies are so wooly I’m not sure how much longer they’ll fit through the barn door! Due to a major shearing accident last year I’ve been banned from the shearing shed. The cartilage on the left side of my ribcage was fractured along with two ribs when Andromeda tossed me into a support post and the wall. My kidney was injured as well. It’s been seven months and my kidney is finally healed. I still have some issues with my ribcage and back. So, I’m actually hiring another shepherd to do the shearing this year. I’ve always prided my brand on nick free shearing. I’ve watched this shearer in action before and he’s very gentle and compassionate. He’ll cut the wool before he’ll cut the sheep so I’m happy. The nice thing – I get to make a video this year AND not be the bad guy!

We are still dealing with downed fences at Serenity from the flood and getting the property back in shape. The front field was plowed this week. I’m currently cleaning cotton seed! That’s right. I’m expanding into cotton. It will be almost a year before it’s ready to harvest, hand clean, and spin. But it’s coming. I was able to get Levant cotton. It’s an heirloom variety and I’ll be able to keep the seed from year to year. This is something I’ve wanted for YEARS. It’s here. Finally. And the timing is perfect.

If you’d enjoy watching the video for this week please check out

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=teo8JHLpUU4

That’s it for this week. Happy Spring.

Until next time,

In all you do

Craft No Harm,

Moriah and the Flock

Saturday in the Studio 03/23/2019

I’m finally moved into the new Studio and more importantly I’m well again. This past six months has been intense. However, my workspace is up and going and I’ve been busy the past two weeks in the wool room. I had planned to revamp the blog and brand in January, but let’s just say life happened. So, along with the rebirth of spring, I’m doing a rebirth of the blog.

On the Wheel

Currently my darling boy Black Iris’ fleece in on the wheel.

As you can see, He’s not so black anymore! This is his gorgeous fall 2018 fleece. It’s short because it’s only four months worth of growth. So, I’m doing a traditional woolen long draw. I’m planning on a new sweater. I haven’t picked out a pattern yet. I’m thinking something with lace on the bottom. So, when I cast on I’ll do a provisional cast on so later I can either bind off or go fancy.

I’m spinning it in nearly a worsted weight two ply yarn. I have a total of three pounds. I hope to get most of it spun this week, but it might take until the end of the month to finish.

In the Dye pot

It’s been a busy two weeks with dying wool. Everything was done in the oven on low temps in small exhaust baths. I’m super happy with the way it all turned out. Locks go in the shop on Wednesday. And I have plenty of not so perfect locks to make art batts. All the dyeing was done with Rit this time due to a generous trash to treasure exchange!

On the Needles

I’m making socks! This week saw a pair of socks casts on and completed. They are Icelandic that my friend Kate spun up. The yarn is THREE PLY lace. I repeat. THREE PLY lace. The girl has some made skills when it comes to spinning lace. She also allowed little puffs in here and there so it has some light texture.

The pattern is Stacey Trock’s Easy Pease Socks. If you haven’t checked out Stacey or her patterns – do it. I LOVE the way this pattern is written. It’s like having a friend teach you how to knit socks. This is the best intro sock pattern I’ve found, and it fits my feet – my fat, flat, extra wide with no heel Cave Woman feet – and daintier peds, too. I was able to crank these out in one day.

In addition to the socks I cast on a new prayer shawl. I spun this yarn in 2012. It was the first time I attempted silk, or dying. I have never done anything with it mostly because of the color. However, I plan to redye the entire project after I’m done knitting. Right now I’m just doing the body and haven’t really picked out what lace I want to do. I do know it’s going to be a SMALL shawl/ collar type piece. I’m also adding some beading.

On the Loom

My loom has been quiet for months now. I think she’s lonely. She calls to me. I moved her in front of the window. The warp for new prayer mats are ready. With any luck this week will be quiet and I’ll at least get the warping done. I’m still thinking for a name for my loom. So far I haven’t found anything for her quiet dignity.

News

I now have a YouTube channel.

https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCq0hfI4MOmsS1mzMh9gkUqw

If you enjoy it, please like and subscribe. Yep. That’s me.

Until next time,

Craft no Harm

Moriah and the flock

Friday’s Farm: Meet Orion – The Jacob Merino Cross

Orion’s Story

It’s not often we have lambs on the farm. However, a few years ago Andromeda and Victor got together unexpectedly and created Orion. He was an unusually large lamb and his sister Minerva was just under a pound. Fortunately I was home because Andromeda needed assistance with the birth.

Orion, or Big Rye as he’s nicknamed, at three months old. He was already well over one hundred pounds and was the official peacemaker on the farm.

It became clear that Minerva would have to be a bottle lamb. Orion however stayed with his momma. By the time he was a month old he was our peacemaker. If anyone was picked on he was there ending the issue and comforting anyone who was upset. Our orphaned lamb would cry and Orion would suddenly appear to lick his head.

Orion has grown into an impressive wether. He’s nearly three hundred pounds, gentle, and all his flock mates seem to enjoy his company. He’s also quite handsome. He’ll never be a cuddle bug like his sister or my Black Iris. But every day he let’s me pat his head and will bob his head in appreciation when he gets corn. Even as a grown boy he follows his mom around like an oversized shadow. However, he’s taken quite a liking to is Aunt Good Night.

Orion and Good Night. Night is a solid 130 lbs. Just to give you an idea of his size. He wasn’t full grown here.

Orion’s Fleece

His fleece is interesting. It’s a little longer than the other Merinos. However, it’s ALMOST as soft as a typical Merino. I’d guess his micron count is around twenty one to twenty four. His color pattern is what’s interesting. I was surprised to find him spotted with tricolor spots. He’s produced a fleece that has grey, black, and smokey patches with white spots. However, coco brown is the main color. The other colors are sporadic and just blend into the brown. His fleece also has a more typical merino clump and dense lock structure. However there is some crimp in it. I’m experimenting with his fleece some. So far I’m pleased with both combing and hand carding his wool. His woolen is super bounce. I love bouncy sock yarn, and his fleece is perfect for it! Since my drum carder is only set up for medium to corse wools currently I haven’t tried a drum carder. His fleece comes out well as either woolen or worsted. If you are interested in his fleece, check out the Etsy shop www.kindfibers.etsy.com . All proceeds go directly to caring for our resident sanctuary animals.

My thoughts on Merino Jacob Crosses

If you are interested in a Merino Jacob cross as a wool pet I can tell you that my crosses are wonderful, hardy, healthy, personable critters. The fleece type varies. However, the quality does not. I’ve been pleased with the fleeces and with the finished products. Or, if you decide to open your land up to grazers in need of a home, this cross is a good choice. Other than minerals, winter hay, water, and a yearly shearing they require little care and are suitable for a novice. As always, if you decide to take one on, make sure it’s a life commitment. They are sentient beings with complex emotions that effect their health.

Until next time,

Craft no harm

Moriah and the flock

Winding Up Wednesday: Why Prep Your Own Fiber

So, let’s start with WHY you might want to prep your own fiber for spinning.

Welcome to the first installment of our series on spinning a raw fleece into scrumptious, yummy yarn. This week focusses on your WHY in the why prep your own fiber question. Next week will be on Why Fiber Prep Matters. The next three weeks will be the exploration of how to wash fiber. Yep. Three weeks of just washing before we get into the knitty gritty of how to prep the washed fiber for actual spinning. So hit the follow button, because this is going to be a long series with allot of info!

 

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The Andromeda Ascendant – I’ll be taking her fleece from raw to finished yarn for this series

 

So, let’s start with WHY you might want to prep your own fiber for spinning. I began my own journey into fiber preparation for animal welfare issues. I also thought it was rather silly to buy roving imported from Australia and New Zealand when my own country is teaming with perfectly good wool sheep. I’m a huge believer in supporting my own economy as well as reducing pollution through my purchases. When I started learning about HOW animals are sometimes treated in the wool industry I decided the best thing to do was to find a shepherd or two, ask some questions, and make sure my dollars were adding to my personal integrity. Once I found a few local ladies who produce ethical wool, I purchased not one, but five small fleeces.

I’ve also found that the quality of my finished yarn is typically better than when I use commercial roving. I have a great deal of control with a fleece because I can sort out spine, dominant, and britch wool. Each category of wool has different qualities and uses. Even the skirting can produce a nice yarn with the correct prep. For me, this is a big WHY in my preference to prep my own fiber.

Many people think cost is a big why. This can, or cannot be true. Much of my highest quality wool sells for $30 a pound. The typical eight ounce bag of roving sells for $20. That’s only a ten dollar difference between the raw wool and the ready to spin commercial roving, and you still have to do work. However, you also might be able to pick up an entire fleece for $10 from a farmer who just wants to cover the cost of shearing. Heck, I’d pay in wool for someone to muck out my barn. There are options out there.

Finally, a big WHY for some people is that the actual process of prepping wool can be relaxing and enjoyable. I’m not saying washing wool is enjoyable for me. But the picking, carding, and combing is an enjoyable aspect of the process. Plus, taking a raw fleece that smells of sheep and barnyard and turning it into a gorgeous sweater yarn is a big reward.

What is your WHY? I’d love to hear about it in the comments section.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

 

 

Winding Up Wednesday

Last week I made a hay run. Big deal, right? I make hay runs all the time. However, this time I parked up the hill from the barn. That’s not so bad. However, I was a little addled due to dropping the trailer in the creek. Like IN THE CREEK, and then sliding back down the bank… I just wasn’t thinking my best when I let the trailer off the truck hitch without having first put concrete blocks and chucks down to lock to the trailer’s wheel. The trailer started rolling down the hill. I screamed, and it dragged me a good six feet before I dug my heels in and stopped it. That’s right. I stopped two thousand pounds of hay headed for my momma and my barn. I’m sore. I’m strained and sprained and all kinds of stiff and aching. So, I haven’t done much spinning. I’m slowly working on the Romney and Jacob. I’ve only gotten three hanks done instead of my usual five to seven a week. I’m still making the finishing touches to my pink and white wrap, and that’s the entirety of my fiber crafts this week.

So, you’re going to hear my philosophy about why everyone in the world should try spinning at least once.

Universal

Pretty much anywhere people grow fiber or can harvest wild fibers, spinning occurs. I was reading an article in Spin magazine recently that highlighted the textile culture of First Peoples in America. My Welsh and Scottish ancestors kept sheep and spun fiber. The Chinese perfected silk cultivation before my Jewish ancestors even existed as a religion, and we know they kept sheep and wove tapestries complete with metal threads.

According to Wikipedia the archeology records show that hand spinning and weaving date back at least twenty thousand years. That’s the Paleolithic era. That’s pretty the dawn of modern humanity. If you sat down a woman from the stone age, Ancient Greece or Africa, an Inca woman from Pre-Columbus America, a Samaritan, or a Scottish granny from two hundred years ago and gave them fiber, they could give you yarn.

What I’m driving at here is that fiber arts, spinning, felting, weaving in its many forms are all part of our universal heritage. It’s in our very DNA as human beings. It has no boundaries of nationality, skin color, ethnic orientation, not political borders. I think that’s one reason I love it so much beyond just the obvious.

Every time I pick up a fleece, sit down and start spinning, I’m connecting to my history as a human being. I think that’s pretty special. So, get out there and embrace your history, people. Because spinning is your heritage.

Until next time,

Craft no Harm,

Moriah