Winding Up Wednesday

Last week I made a hay run. Big deal, right? I make hay runs all the time. However, this time I parked up the hill from the barn. That’s not so bad. However, I was a little addled due to dropping the trailer in the creek. Like IN THE CREEK, and then sliding back down the bank… I just wasn’t thinking my best when I let the trailer off the truck hitch without having first put concrete blocks and chucks down to lock to the trailer’s wheel. The trailer started rolling down the hill. I screamed, and it dragged me a good six feet before I dug my heels in and stopped it. That’s right. I stopped two thousand pounds of hay headed for my momma and my barn. I’m sore. I’m strained and sprained and all kinds of stiff and aching. So, I haven’t done much spinning. I’m slowly working on the Romney and Jacob. I’ve only gotten three hanks done instead of my usual five to seven a week. I’m still making the finishing touches to my pink and white wrap, and that’s the entirety of my fiber crafts this week.

So, you’re going to hear my philosophy about why everyone in the world should try spinning at least once.

Universal

Pretty much anywhere people grow fiber or can harvest wild fibers, spinning occurs. I was reading an article in Spin magazine recently that highlighted the textile culture of First Peoples in America. My Welsh and Scottish ancestors kept sheep and spun fiber. The Chinese perfected silk cultivation before my Jewish ancestors even existed as a religion, and we know they kept sheep and wove tapestries complete with metal threads.

According to Wikipedia the archeology records show that hand spinning and weaving date back at least twenty thousand years. That’s the Paleolithic era. That’s pretty the dawn of modern humanity. If you sat down a woman from the stone age, Ancient Greece or Africa, an Inca woman from Pre-Columbus America, a Samaritan, or a Scottish granny from two hundred years ago and gave them fiber, they could give you yarn.

What I’m driving at here is that fiber arts, spinning, felting, weaving in its many forms are all part of our universal heritage. It’s in our very DNA as human beings. It has no boundaries of nationality, skin color, ethnic orientation, not political borders. I think that’s one reason I love it so much beyond just the obvious.

Every time I pick up a fleece, sit down and start spinning, I’m connecting to my history as a human being. I think that’s pretty special. So, get out there and embrace your history, people. Because spinning is your heritage.

Until next time,

Craft no Harm,

Moriah

Winding up Wednesday: The Babe Production Wheel – A Review

* I am in no way associated with Babe spinning wheels. I’m just reviewing what I like and don’t like about my wheel.

In 2012 I FINALLY got my first spinning wheel. She’s an antique wheel from The Netherlands. I call her Abigail. I love spinning on her, but for serious spinning she’s just not sturdy enough.

And that’s why in 2014 I bought Josephine – my Babe Production Wheel. I decided on a Babe because it was the cheapest option for a double treadle wheel I could fine at the time. I thought about building one, but then I realized by the time I bought the racing wheel chair wheel, the pipes, etc, I’d pay almost as much for some aggravation without a return policy. No thanks.

My Babe arrived one afternoon and within half an hour I was spinning happily. Not too bad for three hundred dollar plumbing pipes and spare parts. So, let me start by telling you what I DON’T like about my wheel. (And don’t tell Josephine, it would hurt her feelings!)

The built in lazy Kate is kind of a joke. I mean, it’s great in a snap, but there’s no way to REALLY flow with properly tensions singles while plying. Over time I’ve learned to adapt, but the dollar store basket with my bobbins on knitting needles still wins.

It’s plastic. Yes. I know, I bought a plastic wheel. It’s not a major issue, but it’s not PRETTY. It’s not sustainable.

It makes an awful racket when I’m winding off a bobbin straight onto my skein winder while said bobbin is on the wheel. No matter how much oil I feed her, she still complains.

Don’t try to do art yarns on this model. They make a bulky wheel for a reason!

Now, onto the likes!

Overall this wheel spins pretty smooth. I think it’s the ball barings. It’s easy to start and stop, speed up and slow down. I like that!

Another fave feature is the double treadle. My calves are even and if I sprain an ankle I can still spin. Considering it’s typically my right ankle I sprain, that’s a big bonus.

The bobbins are a perfect size. Four ounces is a comfortable size for an afternoon of spinning. Of course, if you’re up for a good game of bobbin chicken six ounces is doable.

The company makes spinning bobbins and plying bobbins. The plying bobbins are hard to miss since they’re bright red and bigger than the others. Since the whorl speed is determined by the bobbin size you can really control the ply twist angle easily. This creates a very consistent ply.

What I really enjoy is that in three and a half years of spinning on this wheel I’ve not had one break down, one problem, one broken drive band. I oil it regularly and spin three to eight hours daily. That’s allot of wear with no problems.

Overall, I’m pleased with my Babe. If you’re looking to get into spinning without shelling our almost a grand it’s definitely worth the investment.

That’s it for thisweek’s Winding up Wednesday.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: Tramp Cat and Mittens 

*This post was started weeks ago, but due to technical difficulties it’s just now getting finished and posted. Now to figure out how to replace a charging port…

I am blessed with three good barn cats. They do their job and are sociable with people as well as the sheep. I fact, they often nap with the ewes and out tom Clive loves to go out to the big field with the flock on a sunny day. So, with the cold weather we’ve kept them in carriers in the house at night. The strange thing: we’ve heard a lot of bumps under the house.

Sophie Ann LaClaire is a hybrid someone put out. As far as she’s concerned we’re BFFs.

Now, bumps under the house are normal when Otis, the resident possum, is doing his cat impression at night. He and Sophie the cat are besties. But this is something larger, and well, doesn’t smell like Otis. All the critters have been on edge and I’ve been bracing myself, concerned the foxes had made a new den. But no. It’s a big orange cat tramping around, looking for food. Now that the mystery is solved I can rest a little netter and concentrate on my night knitting.

Cloe. When it’s super cold I let her sleep on the foot of the bed… where she actually stays.

On the Wheel

My piles of Romney fleeces are spinning up nicely. Spinning in the grease means no prep time. Usually I spin up a pound of prepared with plying included in fourteen to fifteen hours (and I’ve done it in a single insane day). When I spin in the grease my average is half a pound in eighteen hours. However, it usually takes me about twice that long to really prep the fibers. So, with the massive cold front still clinging to the country, it’s enjoyable to not scour.

Off the wheel

I completed my mitten spinning! I wasn’t sure about mixing the courser Targhee and Jacob wool with my gorgeous fawn alpaca. But I’m truly pleased. The alpaca really softened up what is traditionally sock yarn in my house.I had planned to felt, but it’s thick, warm, and comfortable just like it is.

Since the mitten yarn came out so nice I dug out the coveted Hopkins fluff left over from combing on my viking combs. Most people toss it, but, well, that’s not my style. I picked through it to get out the neps and noils, then got busy with the hand carders. I’m even more pleased with the softness of this yarn. I may snag Go Lightly’s fleece this year from my neighbor. He’s Hopkins’s son and the fleece is very similar. In short, I want to reproduce this blend for both color and texture.

On the Needles

I’m finishing up my mittens. Honestly, I’m not sure what to knit next. I know I’ll need a sweater next year, and maybe a hooded cowl, but otherwise the household is set on knit wear for a few years barring mice and moths. And, I’ve got to concentrate on spinning and weaving along with up coming farm work for spring.

Off the Needles

I made two new hats for chores. They’re leftovers from other past projects. I didn’t use a pattern. Both are knitted flat and then stitched up the side. My ears are much happier!

Out of the Pot

Last autumn when it was Kavass making season I tried dyeing with beets. I crave a red dye that’s deep and substantial. However, beets are not a color fast dye. So now I have a three pound Jacob fleece with a weird yellowish cast coupled with pink streaks. Not good.

Last week I pulled out my dye pot and cherry koolaid. Can I just say “Yummy”? I’m calling it Cherry Cola Float. The red with hints of the Jacob browns with just hints of pinks and whites is so lovely. With the puni style rolags I added a touch of firestar. When I’m done working up this batch they’ll being the Etsy shop. I’m thinking next is green, or yellow. I feel a soda themed color way collection coming on!

Weaving

My little wrap is off the loom.

Even though it’s off the loom, the work isn’t over.

I’m warping for a double width throw blanket. Frankly, I AM NERVOUS. This is my first time using only my best handspun to double width. But hey, slow and steady wins the race, and that’s my plan.

Hopefully my technical issues are resolved.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

Winding up Wednesday: The “Trash” Fleece

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The problem with perfect fleeces or “Did you have to tell me that?”

If you’ve been following this blog then you know I have a policy of no fleece left behind. Simply stated there are no trash fleeces in my world. However, like so many sectors of Western culture, wool processing has become severely detached from reality.  There’s an unvoiced expectation that raw fleeces are fluffy, free from vegetable matter, long in staple legnth, and cheap. Any other fleece is simply unworkable and unworthy. This puts pressure on both the producer and the sheep. Remember the sheep?  You know, those cute prey animals we’ve bred to produce wool, some to the point of wool blindness? Those darling lambs who love nothing more than to play in brambles and don’t mind sleeping in their own berries? Those cuddle bugs that burp fermented grass and smell, well, like a barnyard? Yep, they’re pretty gross when it comes to personal hygiene.

The reality of keeping sheep coated, changing those coats four times a year, and acting in best interest of the sheep is more complex. Have you ever tried to dress a toddler that doesn’t want to be dressed? Now imagine that toddler is the same weight as you, or more. Ever dressed a two hundred pound toddler? I have. It’s not exactly easy. Then there’s the ethical considerations of adding weight and heat to an animal in the summer along with increased risk of injury if the coat fails (fancy a broken leg anyone?). Or, you can just leave the sheep on pasture away from the hay and hope they aren’t eaten or just horrifically mauled. So, that leaves the majority of fleeces with higher vm than most drum carders can handle with just a pass or two.

What to do!

Grab a lock of your fleece and a hand carder, or a dog slicker if you’re starting out.

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Place the carder on your lap.

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Now it’s just like brushing hair. Start at the tips, and work up.

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When you get past the middle, turn the lock around and do the same on that end.

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Repeat.

Or watch me do it on YouTube for a bit more details:

*Yes, there are cats in the house since it’s extremely cold. Lily’s fleece is being used for personal garments, so I’m not concerned about contamination. My studio is animal free!

That’s it?

That’s it. Once you’ve done every lock your fleece is ready to card or spin from the fold. You’ll loose some wool, but if you’re paying a fraction of the cost, or nothing, it’s worth it. I’ve done this on fleeces less than two inches in staple length. Yes, there were a few sailor impressions along the way, but it was worth the time and skint knuckle. Here’s a pro tip: don’t attempt this before coffee or four a.m.

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This is the final results from using this method then spinning in the cloud.

And that’s it for this Wednesday! Don’t be afraid of those lower end fleeces with real potential. A little work, a little patience, and you’ll be amazed what you end up with!

Until next time,

In all you do, craft no harm.

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: It’s all Ducky

Unfortunately, I didn’t get this week’s Friday’s Flock posting done because I rehomed a whopping thirty one ducks to a farm in Dixon, Tennessee. It was sweet seeing them meet the other geese and ducks, and a relief that the feed bill is essentially cut in two. My remaining six duck hens are with the chickens, and the drake is now bunking with the geese. Hopefully this way I’ll get to enjoy the eggs, and not have them breeding like, well, ducks all over the farm. But, I did make progress on the knitting and spinning projects.

Duckys

On the Wheel

I’m still spinning Romney in the grease. In fact, I found another fleece in my studio in what I thought was an empty bin. However, the carding on the alpaca and wool mittens is coming along well. Originally, the plan was for seventy percent wool and thirty percent alpaca. Then I  realized i want them even warmer. So, it’s a fifty fifty blend. I ran out of jacob wool, so instead I’m finishing up with black targee. It’s not as soft, and boy is it high in vm. But the color matches, and it should felt nicely.  It goes on the wheel this evening!

On the Needles 

My mom loves handspun socks for slippers around the house. I wanted to have them done last week, but it didn’t happen.  Between hay runs, freezing weather, a ewe coming up pregnant, Christmas dinner, moving into the main house for the remainder of the winter, and ducks, they just didn’t get done. Oh, and they needed resizing in the toe. Like, serious resizing. We got a good laugh. So, this one is almost done, and then it’s mitten time!

Off the Needles 

Technically, this was done last Monday. However, it was a gift and a surprise. It was supposed to be a sheep, but I think it’s more bear than sheep. I’ve never made a stuffed animal before.  Not bad for a first go. It was fun to make, and maybe there will be more in the future.  Maybe. But he is super cute.

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Chesca’s Lamb turned Bear!

On the Loom

I did get the loom warped! This time I’m making a wrap. It’s acrylic, but this piece needs to be washable. It’s just a simple tabby weave, and it’s coming along quickly.

Well, I’m off on another hay run and to muck the stalls.

Until next time,

In all you do, craft no harm.

Moriah

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