Daisy’s 2019 fleece is now available!

This is Daisy’s sixth fleece, and it’s another stellar example of Romney Wool. This wool works up lustrous, strong, and has high memory. This is one of my favorite resident sheep to spin yarn from. I’ve made everything from hats and mittens to socks, shawls, sweaters and throws from her previous fleeces and I’m never disappointed. Her fleece takes dye very well, especially plant dyes. I make the majority of my dyed locks from Daisy locks every year. It’s hard to believe she is seven years old!

Daisy’s Story: Daisy joined the flock in 2015 about two months before we moved to our current farm. We didn’t know she was pregnant at the time with Lilly and Black Iris. She was slated for auction due to an inbreeding issue in her former flock. We were called and she became one of our resident sheep. We also found out she has a teat injury that most shepherds would send her to slaughter over. She has successfully managed to raise two sets of twins even with the injury. We nicked named her “Tank” because she makes such a huge strong fleece every year, and she’s just a big girl. Daisy loves to eat grain, stomp her foot at the sheepdog, and lay under the trees. She is a registered Romney. We have managed to acquire all but one of her lambs, and she lives in a complete family unit with her three daughters Lilly, Loral, and Lilac, her sone and Black Iris. Her granddaughter/aunt Peppermint has also joined the flock.

2019 health update: Daisy, along with several other flock members contracted an infection that caused arthritis to set up in her leg joints after our farm flooded. She was successfully treated, but now has a slight hitch in her gait. She’s a senior and this type of infection often leads to death in ewes her age. We are so happy that she is fully recovered for the most part and is enjoying her golden years. Her daughter Lilac has taken over as herd queen, but Daisy remains the family matriarch. She seems to be enjoying her retirement

If interested in purchasing Daisy’s raw wool please visit our Etsy shop. All sales go to supporting our animals. https://www.etsy.com/listing/510851062/raw-romney-wool-raw-unwashed-locks-from

Saturday in the Studio April 6, 2019

The weather is stellar today at the Cove. I can’t believe this is the same farm that was bare trees and mud just a month ago. My onions are up, the garlic is growing, and I even have a few small lettuce plants up. It’s a good thing I farm, because this wasn’t my week in the Studio. I broke the drum carder and hand carders. They’re at the carpenter’s.So, this week you’ll have to just grab a mug of your favorite beverage (mine is coffee) and enjoy a tour of the Kind Fibers sanctuary.I did complete two shawl. The details are in the video.https://youtu.be/rya8u8EfDooUntil next time,Craft No Harm,Moriah and the flock

Friday’s Farm: Meet Orion – The Jacob Merino Cross

Orion’s Story

It’s not often we have lambs on the farm. However, a few years ago Andromeda and Victor got together unexpectedly and created Orion. He was an unusually large lamb and his sister Minerva was just under a pound. Fortunately I was home because Andromeda needed assistance with the birth.

Orion, or Big Rye as he’s nicknamed, at three months old. He was already well over one hundred pounds and was the official peacemaker on the farm.

It became clear that Minerva would have to be a bottle lamb. Orion however stayed with his momma. By the time he was a month old he was our peacemaker. If anyone was picked on he was there ending the issue and comforting anyone who was upset. Our orphaned lamb would cry and Orion would suddenly appear to lick his head.

Orion has grown into an impressive wether. He’s nearly three hundred pounds, gentle, and all his flock mates seem to enjoy his company. He’s also quite handsome. He’ll never be a cuddle bug like his sister or my Black Iris. But every day he let’s me pat his head and will bob his head in appreciation when he gets corn. Even as a grown boy he follows his mom around like an oversized shadow. However, he’s taken quite a liking to is Aunt Good Night.

Orion and Good Night. Night is a solid 130 lbs. Just to give you an idea of his size. He wasn’t full grown here.

Orion’s Fleece

His fleece is interesting. It’s a little longer than the other Merinos. However, it’s ALMOST as soft as a typical Merino. I’d guess his micron count is around twenty one to twenty four. His color pattern is what’s interesting. I was surprised to find him spotted with tricolor spots. He’s produced a fleece that has grey, black, and smokey patches with white spots. However, coco brown is the main color. The other colors are sporadic and just blend into the brown. His fleece also has a more typical merino clump and dense lock structure. However there is some crimp in it. I’m experimenting with his fleece some. So far I’m pleased with both combing and hand carding his wool. His woolen is super bounce. I love bouncy sock yarn, and his fleece is perfect for it! Since my drum carder is only set up for medium to corse wools currently I haven’t tried a drum carder. His fleece comes out well as either woolen or worsted. If you are interested in his fleece, check out the Etsy shop www.kindfibers.etsy.com . All proceeds go directly to caring for our resident sanctuary animals.

My thoughts on Merino Jacob Crosses

If you are interested in a Merino Jacob cross as a wool pet I can tell you that my crosses are wonderful, hardy, healthy, personable critters. The fleece type varies. However, the quality does not. I’ve been pleased with the fleeces and with the finished products. Or, if you decide to open your land up to grazers in need of a home, this cross is a good choice. Other than minerals, winter hay, water, and a yearly shearing they require little care and are suitable for a novice. As always, if you decide to take one on, make sure it’s a life commitment. They are sentient beings with complex emotions that effect their health.

Until next time,

Craft no harm

Moriah and the flock