Saturday in the Studio 03/23/2019

I’m finally moved into the new Studio and more importantly I’m well again. This past six months has been intense. However, my workspace is up and going and I’ve been busy the past two weeks in the wool room. I had planned to revamp the blog and brand in January, but let’s just say life happened. So, along with the rebirth of spring, I’m doing a rebirth of the blog.

On the Wheel

Currently my darling boy Black Iris’ fleece in on the wheel.

As you can see, He’s not so black anymore! This is his gorgeous fall 2018 fleece. It’s short because it’s only four months worth of growth. So, I’m doing a traditional woolen long draw. I’m planning on a new sweater. I haven’t picked out a pattern yet. I’m thinking something with lace on the bottom. So, when I cast on I’ll do a provisional cast on so later I can either bind off or go fancy.

I’m spinning it in nearly a worsted weight two ply yarn. I have a total of three pounds. I hope to get most of it spun this week, but it might take until the end of the month to finish.

In the Dye pot

It’s been a busy two weeks with dying wool. Everything was done in the oven on low temps in small exhaust baths. I’m super happy with the way it all turned out. Locks go in the shop on Wednesday. And I have plenty of not so perfect locks to make art batts. All the dyeing was done with Rit this time due to a generous trash to treasure exchange!

On the Needles

I’m making socks! This week saw a pair of socks casts on and completed. They are Icelandic that my friend Kate spun up. The yarn is THREE PLY lace. I repeat. THREE PLY lace. The girl has some made skills when it comes to spinning lace. She also allowed little puffs in here and there so it has some light texture.

The pattern is Stacey Trock’s Easy Pease Socks. If you haven’t checked out Stacey or her patterns – do it. I LOVE the way this pattern is written. It’s like having a friend teach you how to knit socks. This is the best intro sock pattern I’ve found, and it fits my feet – my fat, flat, extra wide with no heel Cave Woman feet – and daintier peds, too. I was able to crank these out in one day.

In addition to the socks I cast on a new prayer shawl. I spun this yarn in 2012. It was the first time I attempted silk, or dying. I have never done anything with it mostly because of the color. However, I plan to redye the entire project after I’m done knitting. Right now I’m just doing the body and haven’t really picked out what lace I want to do. I do know it’s going to be a SMALL shawl/ collar type piece. I’m also adding some beading.

On the Loom

My loom has been quiet for months now. I think she’s lonely. She calls to me. I moved her in front of the window. The warp for new prayer mats are ready. With any luck this week will be quiet and I’ll at least get the warping done. I’m still thinking for a name for my loom. So far I haven’t found anything for her quiet dignity.

News

I now have a YouTube channel.

https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCq0hfI4MOmsS1mzMh9gkUqw

If you enjoy it, please like and subscribe. Yep. That’s me.

Until next time,

Craft no Harm

Moriah and the flock

Winding up Wednesday : Fleece Washing Method – The Washer

As promised, here is installment one on how to wash a fleece. Today’s focus is on using the washing machine. Yes. If you inherited a top load washer, you can wash a fleece in it! Carefully. Very carefully.

As you most likely know, fleeces felt with agitation. Therefore, it’s more soaking and rinsing a fleece in the washer than “washing” the fleece in the manner a that your lovely machine was designed for. Stay close. Watch it like a hawk, and every thing will be fine.

I personally prefer to wash fleeces with low vegetable matter, low lanolin, and low yuck factor this way. Also, I try to keep the fleece between two and five pounds. Over or under, and my mom’s washer tends to become unbalanced.

Instructions

1. Fill tub with hot water and turn off machine.

2. Add your soap and swish lightly.

3. Submerge your wool and close the lid.

4. Wait about 30 minutes

5. Put your washer on spin – SKIP AGITATION!!

6. Fill with hot water and turn machine off. If you think your wool is still mucky or greasy go ahead and repeat steps two through five. If you’re happy let your wool soak in this rinse water.

7. Spin again

8. Remove.

9. Place in a sunny spot laid out on a screen or on a rack to dry.

Conclusion

It’s not as scary as it sounds. Just remember that agitation is what causes felting. As long as you keep it to soaking and spinning you’ll be fine.

Stay tuned for hand washing!

Until then,

In all you do,

Craft no Harm

Moriah and the flock20180412_153945

Winding Up Wednesday: Why Prep Your Own Fiber

So, let’s start with WHY you might want to prep your own fiber for spinning.

Welcome to the first installment of our series on spinning a raw fleece into scrumptious, yummy yarn. This week focusses on your WHY in the why prep your own fiber question. Next week will be on Why Fiber Prep Matters. The next three weeks will be the exploration of how to wash fiber. Yep. Three weeks of just washing before we get into the knitty gritty of how to prep the washed fiber for actual spinning. So hit the follow button, because this is going to be a long series with allot of info!

 

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The Andromeda Ascendant – I’ll be taking her fleece from raw to finished yarn for this series

 

So, let’s start with WHY you might want to prep your own fiber for spinning. I began my own journey into fiber preparation for animal welfare issues. I also thought it was rather silly to buy roving imported from Australia and New Zealand when my own country is teaming with perfectly good wool sheep. I’m a huge believer in supporting my own economy as well as reducing pollution through my purchases. When I started learning about HOW animals are sometimes treated in the wool industry I decided the best thing to do was to find a shepherd or two, ask some questions, and make sure my dollars were adding to my personal integrity. Once I found a few local ladies who produce ethical wool, I purchased not one, but five small fleeces.

I’ve also found that the quality of my finished yarn is typically better than when I use commercial roving. I have a great deal of control with a fleece because I can sort out spine, dominant, and britch wool. Each category of wool has different qualities and uses. Even the skirting can produce a nice yarn with the correct prep. For me, this is a big WHY in my preference to prep my own fiber.

Many people think cost is a big why. This can, or cannot be true. Much of my highest quality wool sells for $30 a pound. The typical eight ounce bag of roving sells for $20. That’s only a ten dollar difference between the raw wool and the ready to spin commercial roving, and you still have to do work. However, you also might be able to pick up an entire fleece for $10 from a farmer who just wants to cover the cost of shearing. Heck, I’d pay in wool for someone to muck out my barn. There are options out there.

Finally, a big WHY for some people is that the actual process of prepping wool can be relaxing and enjoyable. I’m not saying washing wool is enjoyable for me. But the picking, carding, and combing is an enjoyable aspect of the process. Plus, taking a raw fleece that smells of sheep and barnyard and turning it into a gorgeous sweater yarn is a big reward.

What is your WHY? I’d love to hear about it in the comments section.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah