Monday’s Musings : I Can’t Do EVERYTHING

I was raised in a time of shifting ideology in this country. Traditional gender roles and second wave Feminism clashed in the media and stereotypes clashed around me as the child of a single mother in a male dominated industry. A male teacher told my mother he was shocked at how “well adjusted” I am considering I was from a “broken home”. Mom’s reply “children are only broken if you tell them they are broken”. Feel free to use that line.

I was fortunate enough to have my Papa. As a ninth generation Florida Cracker Native he believed a woman can do anything, but that doesn’t mean women should do everything. My grandmother and mom worked the fields alongside him. My grandmother was a better shot overall. We came from an older society where men and women had to be equals to survive. Women had to know how to shoe a horse and brand calves, and men had to know how to make dinner and clean house. There was never a doubt in my mind I could do or be in any occupation. My gender has nothing to do with my ability for accomplishments.

So, I went to South America. I rode horses, earned degrees, called out a few Vice Presidents at major companies, and was even a professional ballroom dancer for a while. I hike, train oxen, tramp through the woods on my own, work on my vehicles, shear, shoot, and I’ve even been known to wrangle a few orphaned calves. I can do anything.

And this, ladies, is the part some of you will dislike. Just because I can do it, doesn’t mean I should. In addition to my accomplishments I have broken my ribs numerous times, broken four vertebrae and fractured a hip. I have bone spurs, arthritis, tendon damage. I have a permanent brain injury from one too many concussions. My left shoulder has dislocated three times and my right ankle twice. I’m missing bones in that foot, too. Everyday is pain. Sitting is painful. Walking is painful. Breathing is painful. Laying down is painful. Attitudes have consequences, especially for adventurous girls.

Am I equal in value to a man? OF COURSE! But as I’ve aged I’ve realized just because I can do anything doesn’t mean I should do everything. I simply lack the physicality to do things that men can do, and I’m a pretty robust gal. As Paul pointed out in the Christian Bible “all things are permissible, but not all things are beneficial”.

At some point, overdoing physically becomes self harm. The “I can do anything” idea is dangerous without the tempering “but that doesn’t mean I should”. That holds true for everyone regardless of gender, because even in caring for ourselves physically we are all equal.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah and the flock

Monday’s Musings: The Illusion of Control

Today (Sunday) was one of those days. I overslept, and while stumbling from my camper up to the main house I discovered the cattle were out. Cash had “the calves” out front and upon seeing me directed them towards to logging road leading up to the woods – and eventually Kentucky. I hollered at mom and ran after them. Remember that running… it’s a theme. Fortunately, Profit, my little Jersey Angus ox to be likes me happy and helped me bring them into the barnyard. He and his baby brother Asset stopped off at their stall and had a snack while the rest of the bunch returned to the momma cows. I went back to get the boys and discovered that Asset was bit, well, on his namesake. He’s also bit on the leg. I think either a dog or coyote got after the younger animals. I lean towards a dog running them.

Later, we made a hay run. It was pleasant. But we spent a great deal longer than expected. We came home, started chores, and then chased the cows and “the calves” across the river and through the woods. Okay, I chased the cattle. Finally, mom appeared with the grain in the front field (after I chased them there) and into the secured paddock they all went with plenty of hay.

They sheep were WILD. The excitement with the cattle really lit a fire under their silliness. It was actually pretty funny to watch. My rooster Kang and his hen got out. I finally ran him into a stall and closed the door. Nancy the Gander became separated from the rest of the gaggle. Again – running. I no sooner had him in when Dragland the head gander attacked him. Draggy is spending some alone time this evening. Somewhere during all of this Henny Penny, my blind hen, started having breathing issues. We rushed her into the house and performed the necessary vet care. She’s much better.

These are just the highlights from today. Today with plans of fencing, baking breakfast bars, gathering wood violets for homemade candies violets, clean sheets drying on the line, and a Sunday afternoon nap. We had a plan. We had poise. We had control.

No. We had a plan. We had poise. We had chaos. Control is only an illusion. I can call today a bad day, or I can call it today. Today was just today. I accept today just as it is, as it was, as it will be. I have no control over today. I have no control over tomorrow. By simply accepting today as today I have no real disappointment. While chasing the cattle I discovered a patch of dyer’s broom, a glorious patch of violets, a new red flower I’ve never seen before, and found out my old retired milk cow has allot more agility than I thought. Profit proved that he can listen even in trying circumstances. We have a new hay source.

The only control I have is to accept and allow each day, or to fight every moment and rob myself the pleasures that each moment bring. Control is only a feeling, and it’s a feeling born of fear and disappointment. I don’t know about you, but that’s not something I really want in my life.

Until next time,

Craft no harm

 

Moriah

Friday’s Farmlife: Garden Planning

Most people think winter is not the time for gardening. But in reality, winter is when the gardening cycle begins. Even though I’m not out working much this time of year, there’s still work to be done.

I’ve decided to branch out and cover more aspects of farm life and homesteading than just the sheep. There’s SO MUCH to share that goes on around here! There are so many skills that people have lost, and that I’m learning. Things that need to be shared. Without further adue, let’s get into it.

 

GARDEN PLANNING

Most people think winter is not the time for gardening. But in reality, winter is when the gardening cycle begins. Even though I’m not out working much this time of year, there’s still work to be done.

I can and preserve much of our winter food in a typical year. I start my plan by figuring out what I have cheap and easy access to, what is more expensive, and what I actually have room to grow. I also look at what can be preserved that’s expensive in winter. Lately that seems like everything.

My current garden is on top of solid bedrock and gravel. This means everything goes in beds, and I make my dirt yearly via compost. This is labor intensive, and really curtails my planting. Space is at a premium. This means harder to find, higher priced food gets top billing. But, I also know what we eat most.

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Like most Southern families we love our garden fresh, homegrown, never even seen a hothouse tomatoes. I know we need ten tomato plants, plus about another ten bushels from the local Mennonite community for our household. This is a year’s supply of fresh tomatoes, soup, chili, and sauces. One plant will be a high yield cherry tomato, five are heirlooms, and four are determinate that get replaced mid summer. I’m a fan of black tomatoes, too, but enjoy yellow or orange salsa. Tomatoes are also a big chunk of our weekly food budget as well as a big space taker in the garden. Based on this information, I can easily pick out what varieties to start in March or purchase in May. This year I’m going with Black Cherry, Purple Cherokee, German Queen, and Old Mennonite along with Better Bush as my determinate type.

We also love onions and garlic around here. I have elephant garlic and a landrance type garlic Uncle Enis gave me my first year here. Since alums enjoy repeat growing in the same bed, it’s easy to plan for those plants. The same is true of my asparagus patch. It’s pretty much not going anywhere until I begin divisions year after next. All I do is trim the old foliage and put on thin layer of compost down in the spring.

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Potatoes are another staple for us. I have good success growing them in wire towers. Since the sheep don’t like them, I can actually just plant them along the fence row and save valuable bed space. I usually end up with ten to fifteen pounds per tower. It’s definitely the easiest and least labor intensive way I’ve ever grown potatoes. I always grow Pontiac Reds. They melt like butter in my mouth. We have potatoes right up until December. This year I’ll be planting ten towers.

From there I look at what else we actually eat. Peas, zucchini, beets, radishes, purple cauliflower, greens, lettuce, kale, cabbage, Broccoli, winter squash, corn, green beans, spinach, rocket, cucumbers, herbs, and shelly beans made the list.

Our corn will go our front, and so will the squash and beans. I’m planning on trying three sisters this year. The rest go in back far away from the animals and right out the back door.

Cabbage, beets, and green beans are easy to come by, as are strawberries, plums, blackberries, apples, and melons. In fact, I usually snag free culls from behind the produce washing and packing houses. Since I can find these for free or cheap, I pass on growing them. I also know I grow some things other people don’t. Last year I traded for three gallons of mulberries. Yum.

I draw out my garden space into different sections, and then draw out each section with its beds. My beds are thirty inches by about twelve feet. From there I put in high priority  food – peas, zucchini, greens, lettuce, kale, and herbs. If there’s any room left over I might try a new plant. This year, it’s cockscomb on the outside of the garden.

As my early spring crops die off I’ll replace them with broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, carrots, and shelly beans.  This way I can have fresh food from March until December. That’s ten months. Whatever we do not eat in a few days gets canned each harvest. There’s nothing better in the dead of winter to pop open a can of tomatoe soup base, toss in some beans and potatoes, herbs, spices, and have a hot bowl of chili grown on your own land. This means we eat what’s in season typically.

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Why

Like many working class families we are always looking for ways to reduce our grocery bill. If we grew nothing but lettuce and spinach in pots we’d save over sixty dollars a month for two people. The same goes with our tomatoes. At a dollar a can, and ten cans a week, growing tomatoes saves us $520 a year, and that doesn’t include fresh tomatoes. Just those two items is an entire month’s income not going out yearly. Add in the six or seven dozen cantaloupes, the gallons of fresh berries, a few hundred pounds of potatoes, another hundred pounds of onions, and you are up to THOUSANDS OF dollars in food. Yes, it costs money to get started, but once you have heirloom seeds, and learn to save them, most of the cost is done. Gardening can be pretty much free.

Another reason is that it’s fun, and healthy. It feels good to get out there and do something in nature. It’s physical without being strenuous.

We can sell some of our extra food or trade it for other items we don’t have.

I enjoy it. The garden, the thrill of pulling beautiful food out of the canner, and eating my handiwork all year. It just tastes better. When you eat fresh homegrown food you are eating the height of nutrition.

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Closing Tips

Garden planning really isn’t too hard. It just takes some time, some thinking, and a bit of mindfulness. It’s really just menu planning, but way ahead! If you want to plan a garden, now is the time to contact your local ag extension office and find out what time to plant in your area.

No matter if you’re doing rows, containers, or doing beds, start simple and don’t go overboard.

Don’t be afraid to put in long term plants and plant around them.

The twenty five cent packets of seeds grow just as well as the $2 packets of seeds.

Buy heirlooms and collect your seeds each year.

Have fun.

Until next time,

Craft no harm,

Moriah

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Friday’s Flock – The Mighty Ox & How NOT to Handle Mucking the Sheep Pen

The Mighty Ox

 

I always wanted a pony growing up. I’m a good rider, and I trained hunter/jumper. I’m also good at using a horse to round up, drive, and cut cattle. I was never horse obsessed, but I was definitely horsey. So, I was excited to get my first horse. Then I was relieved to rehome her. Living with a horse and riding a retired champion are very different experiences. Somehow I expect them to act more like cattle.

So, when Bossy had a calf in 2016 I decided we needed an ox. Duke just isn’t cut out for life as a riding ox. He knows every command, he loves to do what you tell him. But, he’s a hot mess on his top line with a shark fin down his back. If you’re looking for a year old Jersey to pull, I have a deal for you!

So, a few months ago I decided to train Asset as an ox. He’s my little bottle mini Jersey. He has always looked and acted more like a little doe than a steer. He isn’t especially bright either, but he’s sweet, calm, loves me, and has a smooth back. He just can’t figure out right from left.

A few weeks ago we were walking through the woods. He heard a squirrel in the bushes and jumped between me and the bush, pawing in a challenge.  Yeah. That’s my boy and his heart of gold. He’ll never be big and strong, but he’s my mighty ox.


Mucking 

Oh mucking! It’s the great challenge of keeping animals in a barn. Be it horses, cattle, ducks, geese, chickens, or chinchillas, somehow all that wonderful fertilizer has to get out of the barn an be transformed into usable compost. I use composted manure in my garden. It makes gorgeous, healthy, disease and bug resistant plants. People say my tomatoes are excellent. I tell them to thank the sheep.

Like many homesteaders I own all most every Joel Salitan book written. He has some wonderful ideas. One idea is to let everything stay in the barn until spring and muck it out in with a tractor or skidder. The hay and the flock’s deposits are supposed to break down into beautiful compost. I don’t have a tractor or skidder. I think that was my first mistake.

The second was thinking my gang of mutannous hooligans would actually eat their hay instead of pulling it out and using it as bum fodder. In Joel’s defense we do have some gorgeous compost absolutely. However, the day I realized my head was even with the barn loft, I decided to abandon ship.

Now, you’d think I would just get in there with the shovel and rakes and the truck and be done. After all, it’s only twelve sheep, not one hundred. After three hours and several truckloads the pen floor is now three inches lower. Yep, one inch an hour. Keep in mind it usually takes me five minutes to rake out the pen daily. Five minutes of raking versus an hour of heavy shoveling. This definitely did not save time, energy, or my neck.

So, for now I’m back to raking out the top layer of bedding everyday and spending an hour or two every week hauling compost to the garden. I expect to be dug out by summer – just in time to haul bags of gorgeous, clean compost to the farmer’s market.

In all you do, craft no harm

Moriah

Sunday’s Sassy Stitch and Spin: The Deluge 

We had four inches of rain over this past week, and almost three were over a twenty four hour period. The entire homestead quickly went from damp to soggy to a trees floating through the front yard and wading through squelching mud. I’ve gotten lots of spinning and knitting done this week!

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Our driveway and front field. The water is about waist deep.

On the Wheel 

This past week I’ve been spinning up a beautiful Romney fleece in the grease as featured in this week’s Winding up Wednesday: Spin that Fleece.

Romney Fleece

My current sweaters are rather breezy commercially produced cotton. So, with over fifty pounds of white Romney wool in my studio and another twenty in the barn I decided knitting a sweater for myself is in order. It’s spinning up into a soft aran weight three ply. Once I have enough yarn for a decently long sweater with a shawl collar I’ll put this fleece on my combs and make yarn for the Etsy shop. I plan to spin Romney for the next several weeks, so there won’t be too much to report for the next thirty pounds of spinning.

In addition to the three ply I’ve spun up some hanks of two ply sport as a gift. One of the mini hanks is dyed using marigolds.

Two ply made from mother and daughter. They didn’t full at the same rate…. but still it’s the thought, right?

 I’ve also been spinning up random bits of fleeces that I’m finding here and there. Any fluff bits less than half a pound are getting stuffed into a bag. I plan to just put it all randomly through the drum carder when I get a few pounds. It’s destined to be brilliant or shear madness.

I do plan on squeezing in some Targee alpaca blend this week. I desperately need new mittens for morning chores. I’m hoping with the Targee it felts easily and with the alpaca it keeps me warm.

Off the Needles 

My Sacre Couer shawl is finally knitted up and finished! I had to frog out the original work due to a dropped stitch. I tried to fix it, but if you’ve ever tried to fix a dropped stitch in a complicated lace knitting pattern, then you understand why sometimes you need to just love Kermit. I was going to just rip back to the mistake, but then I began looking at my color palette and decided to just start over knitting from the beginning, with bead work.  I’m glad I did. I’ll be reviewing this pattern next week.  It’s a beautiful shawlette, but it definitely had difficulties.

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Sacre Couer Shawlette

I also finished another project this week,  but I have to wait until next week to show it since it’s a gift. But it sure is cute!

On the Needles

I have one sock left to finish up this weekend for tomorrow. It’s just a pair of plain basic socks knitted up on dpn’s. The wool is squishy Jacob. I don’t remember who it is, but I’m think it may be Charlemagne Bolivar’s. I do know these socks are not fancy, but they are super comfy and warm. I may make a new pair for myself, too.

Dyed in the Wool

I’ve continued dying locks this week. Well, I continued until the rain turned or spring muddy and we stopped using piped water until it clears up again. As soon as I have decent light again the locks will go in the Etsy shop, too. And when the water clears up I’ll be finally rinsing that last batch of lavender dyed locks that sitting under the kitchen bench.

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Closing Remarks

This week has been a productive one, even with the weather. Yes, chores in the cold rain aren’t fun, but it has set me thinking on how people traditionally dressed in wool on farms, and what items I can incorporate into a modern style. I have man-made winter and rain clothing, but it never keeps me as warm and dry as my wool. Even the manufactured items I favor tend to be all wool or all cotton.

As much as dealing with this deluge is unpleasant, the water will keep the pasture in shape, providing green grass this spring. I’m thankful for the squelching mud and extra mucking, because it’s the cycle of nature that allows my flock to thrive and keep me warm and dry.

In all you do, craft no harm

Moriah

Friday’s Flock: Mighty Minerva and Dagging 

Mighty Minerva 

Our smallest lamb has grown into our smallest ewe. She weighs only twenty five pounds compared to the average one thirty in the rest of the flock. She was our bottle lamb, and in her opinion chores are a natural part of a sheep’s routine. It’s always sweet and humorous to watch her follow us around and discuss the day’s issues. She also understands gates.

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So, the other day, when I was tired and hungry I closed the main gate to keep the sheep in the barn paddock instead of the main pasture that currently is without fences. Before I could turn around and head to the house, the entire flock spilled out from behind the barn, gambling and leaping into air at a full run, straight into the pasture.  Minerva led the charge, and kept leading the charge until we finally got out the lawn mowers and rounded them back up.

Once all back in the barn lot and the back gate secured with a t-post I watched as Minerva started gumming the latch to open it again. This time she failed. She then began pushing on it. Over came Black Iris, Night, and Loral to investigate. After some none verbal communication the four of them began pushing on the gate. I was impressed both with group effort, and the intelligence. We often sell animals short, but clearly there was serious communication and collaboration at work. Minerva may be small, but she’s a smart cookie, like the rest.

Dagging

The word “dag” first appeared in Late Middle English at the start of the sixteen hundreds. It originally meant a pointed hanging part, or sometimes, a challenge. The Australians applied this word to shepherding, specifically the hanging bits of dung matted into the wool on the backside of a sheep. I think it’s a brilliant use of the word – it hangs, and is a challenge. The word was also transformed from a noun to a verb. These days, we dag sheep, or as this week’s blog is about, we learn about dagging.

Why dag? Well, those nasty bits hanging off the end of the wool sheep are a perfect place for flies to lay eggs and begin inflicting fly strike on the sheep. It can ruin the wool, and kill the sheep. Heavy wool bearers are the most at risk for developing fly strike because the wool goes all the way to the bum. It’s a messy, nasty job, and it’s my job twice a year to trim up the dag end of my sheep.

To demonstrate, I grabbed my buddy Black Iris. He wasn’t overly happy about it, but we  made up later.

In days gone by shepherds used to cut the skin off the back of the sheep in order to prevent fly strike. Fortunately that custom is dying out and dagging is becoming the norm. I use simple house hold scissors for this chore. If I had a large flock I would hire our local shearer, but with only twelve I can spread it out over a couple of weeks. For us, since we don’t dock our sheep any longer, this is an important part of our management.

And that’s dagging.

Have a lovely week, and we’ll see you next week when we clean out our sheep’s pen after a failed experiment.

Until then, In all you do, craft no harm.

Moriah

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Winding up Wednesday – Spin That fleece

Good afternoon, all. It’s been a dreary few days here in Serenity Cove which is the perfect weather for spinning. This week I’m spinning up Amy’s fleece straight as it came off of her. Yes. I’m spinning a raw fleece. No combing, carding, or even flick carding. I did run the fleece through a hot water soak since it’s a 2015 fleece just to soften up the lanolin. 

Why? Have you lost your mind? 

No. There are valid reasons to spin a fleece in the grease. It makes a good warp thread, and the grease helps protect the yarn from the wear warp threads experience during the weaving process. It also increases the water shedding ability of a finished garment to leave lanolin in. It also cuts down on processing time. Imagine spinning up an entire fleece in a week. That’s actually my biggest motivation. It’s also a good challenge, and frankly, you’ll be a better spinner by the end.

But Fleeces are DIRTY!

Oh, I know all about dirty fleeces and what can be lurking in a fleece. That’s why this method is saved for the cleanest fleeces. If you can snag a coated fleece from a low lanolin breed, that’s perfect. If you can snag a low vegetable matter fleece that’s in good shape, it’s also a candidate. If you find a gorgeous fleece with high vm, get out the combs. 

How?

Our foremothers didn’t have luxury fleeces, roving, top, art batts, and all those trappings offered by the industry these days. If they were fortunate they had wheel, maybe combs or carders, and a family to tend. You’ll spin this style just like they did.

First, fluff out the butt end of a lock with your fingers. That’s the thicker cut side that probably looks less worn. Start it on your leader, and begin to draft. Try to draft from the butt ends. It goes better, and any damaged tips or vm will most likely end up on the floor instead of the yarn. Drafting on the fold works well, too. Just avoid drafting from the tip end. It’s really that simple. This is the drafting crucible as a spinner. 

If you watch, I tend to draft back with my left hand and control twist with my right. This comes from spinning long draw for so long. Do what feels comfortable for you, and will give you a consistent spin. If you get into a bunch of nubs and narls, pick them out, and toss that bit of the fleece, and keep going. 

I’ve spun it, now what? 

When you get done you’ll have lanolin laced yarn, maybe even lanolin laced lace yarn. Wash it in hot water. I find a good tea kettle and a small basin are the best tools. Use a little blue Dawn if you must. Don’t let your water cool too much, or the grime will restick. I find three good near boiling soaks does the trick. Congratulations, you’ve spun that fleece. Welcome to the club.

Lessons 

This is the one time to be a total snob about fleece. I really enjoy long wool breeds and Jacob for this kind of spinning. You also can spin this way on a drop spindle as I learned in Bolivia. However, a spinning wheel is much easier. But for me, the biggest thing is how connected I become with the sheep and the process. I always feel more a part of the farm, the experience of the land and abundance when spinning straight from the fleece. In the end, I hope that connection finds you, too.

In all you do, craft no harm. 

Moriah